Last edited by Goltizahn
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of Reclaiming the arid West found in the catalog.

Reclaiming the arid West

George Wharton James

Reclaiming the arid West

the story of the United States reclamation service.

by George Wharton James

  • 234 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Dodd, Mead and Company in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States. -- Bureau of Reclamation.,
  • Irrigation -- West (U.S.),
  • Arid regions.,
  • Reclamation of land -- West (U.S.)

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationxxii, 411 p.
    Number of Pages411
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17636998M

    reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of stream"ow to a target level of 60%. M anifest Destiny and the westward expansion of Eu-ropean civilization in the United States during the 19th century were predicated on an adequate freshwater supply. Water for the West: The Bureau of Reclamation, By Michael C. Robinson. Reviewed by Lawrence B. Lee, Professor of History, San Jose State University, author of Reclaiming the American West: An as he ponders how little credit its critics give the Bureau for bringing water and industrial civilization to the arid West.

      On the one hand are the white farmers who have settled legally within the boundaries of the reservation, "reclaiming" arid land with water provided by federally funded irrigation systems. On the other are the Indians of two tribes, Shoshone and Arapaho, historically antagonistic, reduced by over a century of conquest and together discovering a 5/5(5). Rowley, William D. Reclaiming the Arid West: The Career of Francis G. Newlands. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, CCHS / ROW This book, as its title suggests, does not cover the development of Chevy Chase, but it does provide detailed information about Newlands’ professional life as member of the.

    Reclaiming the native home of hope: community, ecology, and the American West | Robert B. Keiter, University of Utah. Wallace Stegner Center for Land, Resources, and the Environment | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Find books.   Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States Cited by:


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Reclaiming the arid West by George Wharton James Download PDF EPUB FB2

Reclaiming the Arid West: The Career of Francis G. Newlands (American West in the Twentieth Century) [Rowley, William D.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Reclaiming the Arid West: The Career of Francis G. Newlands (American West in the Twentieth Century)Cited by: 5. Reclaiming the Arid West [George Wharton James] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This is a pre historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process.

Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that. Reclaiming the Arid West by William D. Rowley,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.3/5(1). Additional Physical Format: Online version: James, George Wharton, Reclaiming the arid West.

New York, Dodd, Mead and Company, (OCoLC) Buy Reclaiming the Arid West: The Career of Francis G. Newlands (The American West in the Twentieth Century) by Rowley, William D. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : William D.

Rowley. Some progressives sought to transform the arid West into productive farmland by harnessing rivers for irrigation. The Newlands Reclamation Act ofnamed for its champion, Representative Francis G.

Newlands of Nevada, was a pioneering environmental law. Get this from a library. Reclaiming the arid West: the career of Francis G. Newlands. [William D Rowley] -- Widely noted for his role in the passage of the National Reclamation Act ofFrancis G.

Newlands of Nevada was a champion of the growth of federal power in the modernization of America. One of. First edition. Octavo. Frontispiece (portrait of John Wesley Powell). 67 b/w illustrations. Original green pictorial cloth, stamped in gilt, black. Reclaiming The Arid West: The Story of the United States Reclamation Service by James, George Wharton New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, (click for more details).

Reclaiming the arid West: the story of the United States reclamation service Item Preview Follow the "All Files: HTTP" link in the "View the book" box to the left to find XML files that contain more metadata about the original images and the derived formats (OCR results, PDF etc.).

Book digitized by Google from the library of the University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. READ BOOK The Power of the Educated Patient: Proven Strategies for Reclaiming Your Health and.

The University of Utah Press has published Bridging the Distance, a book by the Rural West Initiative of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. Edited by the distinguished historian David B. Danbom and with a foreword by Center co-founding director David M. Kennedy, the book explores the Rural West across four dimensions: Community, Land, Economics – and defining the.

This anthology collects fourteen essays on the environmental history of the American West, exploring diverse approaches to environmental history, the western environment before Anglo-American settlement, the radical environmental transformations of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the rise of the environmental movement after World War II.

The United States Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) has been in existence for over years with the goal of reclaiming arid lands west of the Mississippi River by constructing irrigation projects.

To that goal, Reclamation has built over major embankment dams that have the potential to result in life loss in the event of by: 4. Reclaiming the West with Water Some progressives sought to transform the arid West into productive farmland by harnessing rivers for irrigation.

The Newlands Reclamation Act ofnamed for its champion, Representative Francis G. Newlands of Nevada, was a pioneering environmental law that defined the federal role in western water distribution. National Reclamation Act () PDF When Congress passed the National Reclamation Act inthe measure set in motion the dramatic transformation of arid sections of the American West to "reclaim" land for productive agricultural use.

President Theodore Roosevelt, who signed the bill into law, believed that reclaiming arid lands would. The Reclamation Act developed irrigation systems in reclaiming arid lands in the 17 western states west of the hundredth meridian.

The Bureau of Reclamation built dams and reservoirs providing irrigation water for million acres of land and drinking water for over 31 million people. The Reclamation Act developed irrigation systems in reclaiming arid lands in the 17 western states west of the Hundredth Meridian.

The Bureau of Reclamation has constructed projects that now irrigate million acres of land and drinking water for over 31 million people. These projects also generate electrical power serving 6 million homes.

WATER IS LIFE Water is life: a simple concept; but in the arid west, settlers could not rely on rain to supply water to nourish their fields.

The community at East Portal brought together people of various skills and backgrounds to construct a tunnel that would transfer a portion of the Gunnison River water to the fields of the Uncompahgre Valley to the west.

2hrs West Bengal COVID mortality touchesReclaiming the desert Maseeh Rahman J IST But scientists at the government’s Central Arid.

Reisner and the Cadillac Desert. Numerous critiques of the sustainability of freshwater infrastructure in the western United States have appeared (5, 9 –12).Most poignant of these is Marc Reisner's book Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing r sketches a portrait of the political folly of western water projects; his principal argument is that impaired function of Cited by:   In his map, Powell made the case that the “Arid Region” of the United States by organized by preserving (and indeed asserting) the integrity of its watersheds, in ways that recall the Hydrologic Unit Codes–HUC’s–and proposed a model for conceiving the West not in terms of “public lands” that could be claimed by settlement.